Welcome Margaret!

Margaret joined Neighborhood Partnerships in November 2020. Before NP, she planned public community events at OMSI and coordinated classical music festivals at Chamber Music Northwest. Margaret also regularly volunteers with Rose City Rollers, where she plans fundraising events and coaches developing skaters. She enjoys coordinating logistics and planning events, especially when she gets to use those skills for a good cause.

Originally from central Ohio, Margaret studied flute performance at The Ohio State University and has worked in a variety of nonprofits, from public libraries to chamber music. In her spare time, she enjoys taking care of her houseplants, playing roller derby, and spending time with her spouse and their five pet rats.

For starters, tell me a little about yourself.

I moved to Oregon from Ohio to coordinate chamber music concerts, and subsequently worked at OMSI as a public event planner. I’ve also played roller derby for three years, where I learned a lot (and continue to learn) about working successfully as a team and participating in a positive, equitable community.

I live in Portland with my spouse and five pet rats with vegetable-themed names. There’s usually a rat on my shoulder while I’m working.

What area of expertise and interest do you have?

My background is in classical music—I studied flute performance in college. As I learned more about the importance of accessibility and equity in all areas of life, I realized how inaccessible classical music can be (though it’s improved a lot in the past few years). I’ve become very aware of inaccessibility in all the work I do, and I love learning more about strategies to make programs and communities more accessible for all people.

I really enjoy organizing and coordinating logistics, especially for events. I always feel most passionate about that work when I’m doing something that helps people.

What does opportunity mean to you?

To me, opportunity is when all members of a community—regardless of their background—feel empowered and supported enough to reach their goals. For a community, it takes understanding how one’s background and implicit biases have fed into inequity and taking tangible steps to rectify those problems.

What difference can financial security make for individuals and communities?

Financial security is life-changing. Being financially insecure is exhausting, both mentally and physically. When financial worry is removed, endless opportunities arise—for employment, education, families, and communities. Helping to build financial security for all people results in a stronger community for everyone.

Choose one author, living or dead, that you’d like to have dinner with.

Leigh Bardugo.

What are you looking forward to most about this position?

I’m excited to learn about the work of the IDA Initiative and the Housing Alliance. Everyone at NP is passionate about their work, and I’m thrilled to be part of a team that prioritizes the wellbeing of our community.